Halcyon Days Music - Early 1900s Music
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Halcyon Days Music contains a collection of Early American Music and Vintage Songs from the early 1900s, 1910s and 1920s.

Our archive of vintage music contains a wide assortment of Early American Music and Popular Songs in MIDI music format which you can download and listen to on your computer at home. Each vintage song is accompanied with its vintage sheet music cover and music lyrics.

Southern Gals

Southern Gals

Year 1917

Words by Jack Yellen
Music by Albert Gumble

Jerome H. Remick
New York and Detroit

  First Verse
I've just come back from the South today And there is one thing I'd like to say Tho' I've been most everywhere I've never seen such gals as they have down there. It seems that each little peach you see Is just as sweet as a peach can be Tho' I can't describe them all to you Let me name you just a few.

Second Verse
I kind of wish I'd have stay'd down there It's not so much I need the air But it's true and plain to see Those little southern gals made a hit with me And when I march to the wedding tune I've got a hunch I'll be marching soon When you see my bride you'll understand Why I'm stuck on Dixieland.

Chorus
There's Mary down in Maryland She's mighty pretty And sweet Virginia too She'll make a hit with you You'll go dippy over Mississippi And the gals named Caroline They're birds of a feather So they flock together And believe me they're just fine Then there's Lucy Anna with naughty eyes And a peach named Georgia who takes the prize So if you get lonesome any time Come across the Mason Dixon Line And I'll introduce you to those Southern Gals.

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That Southern Hospitality (When You're Down In Dixie)

That Southern Hospitality (When You're Down In Dixie)

Year 1915

Words by Chas. McCarron
Music by Raymond Walker

Broadway Music Corporation
145 W. 45 St.
New York

  First Verse
I love to meet a man and take him by the hand if he's from Dixie from dear old Dixie Because in Dixie land the people treat you grand. They've got that Southern Hospitality, Gee, there's something the matter with you If you can really be lonesome and blue in Dixie.

Second Verse
You'll find a welcome there on every easy chair When you're in Dixie In dear old Dixie And when you get a meal, you get a meal that's real With good old sweet potatoes Southern style, While there's nothing the matter with me I know a little bit better I'd be in Dixie.

Chorus
When you're down in Dixie, In a town in Dixie, With its Southern ways, Its "Home and Mother" days In their arms they take you Right at home, they make you. Oh, oh, oh, you're always pickin' on a chicken When you're down in Dixie In a town in Dixie You're welcome, you're welcome to all you see, And the population's at the station there When your train pulls in from "Any where" They're always glad to see you, take it from me It's that Southern Hospitality.

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They Called It The Dixie Blues

They Called It The Dixie Blues

Year 1919

Words and Music by Jack Strouse

Joe Morris Music Co.
145 W. 45th St.
New York, NY.

  First Verse
Ragtime Joe with his old banjo, Wanted to compose, Sent for Sloan and his saxophone Said "listen to me, Mose; We'll write a song about the South, And before we're through We'll steal those Southern melodies like all the composers do." And it wasn't very long before they had a Southern song.

Second Verse
Ragtime Joe said now listen, Moe, Let's sail o'er the sea. We'll look 'round and we may jot down a foreign melody." They went to Belgium, England, France, searched to beat the band. They couldn't find tunes that compared With those down in Dixieland. Then they said "I guess we'll stop, there's nothing here for us to cop."

Chorus
They took a little bit of Old Black Joe to start off their refrain, kept strummin', kept strummin', that old familiar strain and they took a little bit of Swanee River and looked around until they found Massa's in the cold, cold ground, and then they took four bars of My Old Kentucky Home, Those Southern tunes they tried hard to confuse, they couldn't lose, away down South in the land of cotton there was nothing they'd forgotten. When it was done and rolled into one they called it the Dixie Blues.

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I'm Happy When The Band Plays Dixie

I'm Happy When The Band Plays Dixie

Year 1907

Words by Earl J. Benham
Music by William J. Vanderveer

The Selig Pub. Co.
53 W. 28th St.
New York City

  First Verse
Have you ever felt a strange sensation, When the band begins to play, Have you noticed how you'll march along, And follow the band all day, Like a soldier boy you're sure to fall in line to hear the music sweet, Troubles you forget now you're marching yet oh it surely is a treat, When they play, "My country tis of thee" every body cheers the good old band, But there's one more tune they'll play it soon it's a song of dear Dixie land.

Second Verse
Thro' dear Dixie old Hi Henry with his minstrel show was booked to play, With his singers grand and one fine band, in town he stayed just one day, On the billboard fence he advertised that thro' the streets they would parade, To be water boy was my greatest joy to the opera house I made, There they dressed me up as Uncle Sam and handed me the flag to wave, Dixie they played loud to please the crowd then for dear Dixie land we raved.

Chorus
I'm happy when the band plays Dixie, It's the land that I love so dear, Where the sweet magnolias rare, Scent that good old southern air Now for dear Dixie I will cheer, Sweet strains of that old grand song Dixie, Bring back thoughts of my childhood days, I wish I was in Dixie, I do, I do I'm happy when the band plays Dixie.

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In Dear Old Dixie I Long To Be

In Dear Old Dixie I Long To Be

Year 1907

By George Thomas Stoddard

Gilman Square Pub. Co.
Somerville, Massachusetts

  First Verse
When the evening shadows lengthen and the sun has gone to rest And the stars begin to shed their tiny rays Then my thoughts turn back to Dixie to the land I love best And I seem to see the scenes of other days I can see my dear old mother standing in the cottage door Thro' her snow white hair the Southern breezes blow But 'tis just a dream of boyhood of the days gone long before In Dixie where the cotton blossoms grow

Second Verse
How often thro' the wildwood with my sweetheart by my side We have stroll'd together whisp'ring words of love For 'twas there that gentle Annie promised me she'd be my bride While the silv'ry moon shone tho' the trees above But those happy days have long since fled and I am sad and lone My heart is sad and tears be dim my eyes Now I want to lie in Southland when my sands of life are run In Dixie where my gentle Annie lies

Chorus
My dear old Dixie so dear to me My dear old Southland I long to see The birds sing sweeter in every tree In dear old Dixie I long to be.

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Checkers

Checkers

Year 1919

By Edgar Allen and Leo. Edwards

McCarthy and Fisher Inc.
224 W. 46th St.
New York

  First Verse
Checkers was the nervy fellow's name, Who picked no winners in the racing game, Until his sweetheart picked the winning horse And rode to fame and fortune on Remorse, He played the game and won out in the end, And here is what he told me like a friend.

Second Verse
From the photo play you will observe, Fortune comes to those who most deserve, When Checkers' fate seemed but an idle guess, Love took the mount and rode it to success, Your horse may balk and leave you at the start, You're sure to win whenever you lead a heart.

Chorus
Life is like a game of checkers, just a game we play, Every move we make means loss or gain, Like a jockey in the racing game, some are driven to a corner throw their stakes away, Only love can lift their crosses, Make them all forget their losses, Life is like a game of checkers Every one must play.

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Evelyn

Evelyn

Year 1916

Music by Hugo Felix
Words by Anne Caldwell

T. B. Harms and Francis Day and Hunter
New York

  First Verse
Love I think is tommy rot, girls are such a funny lot Only one my manly fancy seems to please. But without the least excuse With me she can raise the deuce, For the little villain is a fearful tease, Always messing me about, Till I want to shout.

Second Verse
I could win a score of them, Then I'd win some more of them But upon my soul, I think I'm too blase! Just this one girl seems to start, Little twitters round my heart, Doctor diagnosed the case as "love" today, It is such a fearful bore, I'll have to say once more.

Chorus
Oh, Evelyn, oh, Evelyn, You'll have to quit your devilin'! You tease and antalize me so, You've surely got me "on the go!" Oh Evelyn, Oh Evelyn, Just mind what you're about, If you are on the level in the game you seem to revel in, Oh Evelyn quit your devilin' Just cut it out.

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Faraway In Honolulu (They've Got The Tango Craze)

Faraway In Honolulu (They've Got The Tango Craze)

Year 1917

Words and Music by Burt and Frank Leighton

M. Witmark and Sons
New York

  First Verse
Far away in Honolulu, Where the natives do the tango, Most every evening You can see them dance (See them dance, see them dance) To the funny music playing, You can them all a swaying, If you should go there, They would put you in a trance.

Second Verse
Should you ever take a notion, That you want to cross the ocean, Just take a steamboat to Hawaii land. (To Hawaii, to Hawaii) Travel into Honolulu, Where'll you see the Hula Hula, Just watch those maidens, And hear the Ukelele Band.

Chorus
In Honolulu where they used to dance the Hula, In native costumes and pretty lays, With the Ukeleles playing, They start a swinging and a swaying, Far away in Honolulu They've got the tango craze.

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I'm The Guy That Paid The Rent For Mrs. Rip Van Winkle

I'm The Guy That Paid The Rent For Mrs. Rip Van Winkle

Year 1914

Words and Music By Geo. Fairman

Geo. Fairman
145 W. 45th St.
New York City

  First Verse
To look at me no doubt you think I'm happy I'm really anything but that. I know you wonder why I wear this suit of clothes and my old last summer's hat. There was a time when I had a lot of money But that was many years ago. I met a Missus Rip Van Winkle. That's what became of all my dough

Second Verse
Some people say I look just like the ice man that brought the ice to Winkle's flat. And that the milkman was a friend of Missus Rip's and such foolish things as that. I'm very sorry that I ever met her And I suppose she thinks the same But I must surely give her credit, The way she played her little game.

Chorus
I'm the guy that paid the rent for Missus Rip Van Winkle when Rip Van Winkle went away. He left her all alone, All alone, Like the villain in the play. I spent my money Just like a dead game sport. But I figure I must of been a Jay for I'm the guy that paid the rent for Missus Rip Van Winkle when Rip Van Winkle went away.

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Jazzin' The Blues Away

Jazzin' The Blues Away

Year 1918

Music by Dick Heinrich
Words by Jeff Branen

A.J. Stasny Music Co.
56th W. 45th St.
New York City

  First Verse
Mister let me tell you this is no place to be I just got to beat it you can take it from me Slip on your tuxedo and grab your hat No use hanging 'round this flat Let's all go

Second Verse
Wait until you hear that moanin' groanin' trombone Played by Alexander he can't let it alone Crashing of them cymbals fills you with "pep" Ev'rybody watch your step Let's all go

Chorus
Down to the hall down to that Ebony ball That one place I always lose those doggone Indigo blues because I'm sure to meet my Honey the gal that gets my money Mister Jazz and his band They sure do make you feel grand My goodness how they can play while with your baby you sway They are Jazzin' the Blues away.

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Vintage Music Original Classics from the 1920s and 1930s
Vintage Music Original Classics
from the 1920s and 1930s
  The Naughty 1920s Red Hot and Risque Songs Of The Jazz Age Volume 1
The Naughty 1920s Red Hot and Risque
Songs of the Jazz Age Volume 1


Vintage Halloween
VintageHalloween.org